The Update Wandering Above a Sea

I wanted to talk about Dark Souls 3 last Thursday, but, you know, stuff. Without boring you all, I caught a cold, sustained a (very) minor injury at work–which, due to the nature of my weirdo job, caused me to spiral into hypochondria, contemplate my mortality, and all that good stuff.

But, it looks like I don’t have any deadly pathogens! (So far). That’s a joke (mostly).

On my very first ever super special update, I mentioned a quote from T.S. Eliot–“Do I dare, Disturb the universe?” I think I said something like ‘more on that later.’

Well, it’s later now. I’m about 1/3 of the way through a second self-edit of my novel. After that, my plan is to rewrite. I’d hoped to be further along, but the old morning routine has been lagging. Half of that I attribute to exhaustion. Half to too many cigarettes. I quit (again). Let’s see if it sticks, and if it helps.

So: Eliot and the quote from The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. The poem is, among many things, about crisis of identity. Which is youth in a nutshell. Who am I? What do I become? Do I disturb the universe?

(Note: This quote factors heavily into one my favorite YA novels, The Chocolate War, which is all about consequence of identity.)

I love the notion of romanticism juxtaposed with youth. A sense of grandiose, epic thinking takes place when we are young. The world is forever. Disturbing the universe is an essential question, an essential quest. Consequence of identity is dire and eternal.

The world is more.

 

Next time, I want to get to Dark Souls 3, because therein lies some brutal and truly spectacular fantasy with excellent philosophy. The world and statement these games make, the “story” they tell, is above and beyond most anything out there. But for now, I’ll leave another quote, for another “later.”

 

“Since then, at an uncertain hour,
That agony returns:
And till my ghastly tale is told,
This heart within me burns.”

–Samuel Taylor Coleridge

 

Image credit: Wanderer Above the Sea by Caspar David Friedrich, c. 1818

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